Home Forums Lower Back Pain Reasons Your Lower Back Hurts

0 replies, 1 voice Last updated by Profile photo of Dr. Siddique Dr. Siddique 6 months, 2 weeks ago
  • Profile photo of Dr. SiddiqueDr. Siddique
    Keymaster
    @adminbhss
    #1478

    Do you wake up most days with a dull ache in your low back? Maybe it’s a little twinge that nags you all day long?

    Low back pain is a menace — it affects up to 80% of us at some point in our lives. Most of the time the pain can’t be traced to anything specific.
    That means it’s either all in our heads (some research proves this) or there are things we are doing to contribute to the pain.

    Here are some reasons your low back may hurt right now — and ways to fix them:

    1 – YOU HAVE POOR POSTURE
    When you are hunched over it taxes and stretches the back muscles, while shortening the chest muscles. Stoop over that way for too long and those muscles will stay set — and make standing up straight feel impossible.

    HOW TO FIX IT
    First, make sure your stooped posture is not a result of something more serious. If it’s not, doing exercises to strengthen your core should help you stand more erect. And while you’re at it try these tips from Harvard Health.

    2 – YOU SIT FOR TOO LONG AT WORK
    It’s too easy to let your workday be hijacked by sitting. The time you spend on phone calls and listless scrolling on the computer screen can add up before you realize, ‘Hey, it’s been 3 hours since I got out of this chair!’

    A study published in 2015 found that the longer a large group of workers sat the more intense their low back pain.

    HOW TO FIX IT
    Get up every 20 minutes and grab some water, converse with a colleague or simply stretch a little. Another option: Stand up whenever you get a phone call.

    3 – YOU’VE GAINED WEIGHT
    Is your paunch protruding? If your belly is a lot bigger today than it was last year it can create problems with your spine’s natural curvature — and stress the muscles and ligaments in the low back.

    HOW TO FIX IT
    Every pound you shed is a little bit less stress on the back. Try and add a little more activity to your day — which will also lessen low back pain.
    Also: Try eating more anti-inflammatory foods (blueberries, avocados, salmon) since inflammation is at the root of both overweight and back pain.

    4 – YOU SMOKE
    Did you know that smoking may make your brain less resilient when it comes to pain?
    A recent study found that smokers are three times more likely to have chronic back pain than non-smokers. Smoking may also hasten degeneration in the lower spine.

    HOW TO FIX IT
    Find some support to kick your smoking habit. Acupuncture may help with lower back pain and it helps some people with craving.

    5 – YOU’RE DEPRESSED
    Depression and pain signals travel the same pathways in the brain — so it should be no surprise that the two often go hand in hand. In many cases someone will complain about low back pain and not realize they are depressed.

    HOW TO FIX IT
    Look into treatment for your depression. Several depression treatments also reduce back pain symptoms.

    6 – YOU’RE LIFTING TOO MUCH
    You don’t have to be a construction worker to experience lifting-related low back pain. Even something as simple as slinging a heavy purse over one arm can throw off your low back.

    Add to that all the things we lug on a daily basis — grocery bags, backpacks (children and adults), laundry — and you can see how the low back might become strained.

    HOW TO FIX IT
    Buy smaller bags. The bigger the bag, the more you’ll stuff it. And monitor your kids’ backpack size. We have more tips here.
    And any time you lift something heavy bend your knees and engage your core.

    7– YOU DRINK TOO MUCH
    A recent study found that about 15% of patients who drank alcoholic beverages excessively also had low back pain. It’s not clear why drinking is associated with back pain but the connection appears significant. Our best guess: We tend to drink when we’re watching TV, fishing or just generally sitting around – and being sedentary is bad for your low back.

    HOW TO FIX IT
    Seek help to curb your drinking — and potential other things that go hand-in-hand with alcohol abuse like depression.

    8 – YOU’RE WEARING THE WRONG SHOES
    High heels aren’t just bad for your feet and toes, the problems can travel all the way up to the low back according to the American Osteopathic Association. Heels can throw off your spinal alignment — which stresses the back.

    And men aren’t immune either – especially if they’re standing for long periods of time. Prolonged standing and – as a consequence – shifting body weight back and forth is bad for the spine.

    HOW TO FIX IT
    Lower your heels just a little bit. If that robs you of your fashion sense, alternate between high and lower heels — and even more supportive shoes — during the week. Both men and women may benefit from more comfortable, spine-balancing orthotic shoes.

    9 – ONE LEG IS SHORTER THAN THE OTHER
    Having legs of different lengths is not as uncommon as you might think. Some people are born that way – others have what’s called “leg length discrepancy” due to disease, previously broken bones or infection.

    Even a tiny fraction of a difference in leg length – say ¼ of an inch – can lead to problems like scoliosis, an imbalanced spine, compensation to correct that imbalance and worsening back pain.

    HOW TO FIX IT
    Seek help from your primary care physician or an orthopedic surgeon. They might recommend a shoe lift to balance things out.

    10 – YOUR SPINE IS AGING
    Problems like osteoarthritis, spinal stenosis, spinal compression fracture, or degenerative conditions like spondylolisthesis (when one vertebrae slips on top of another) all tend to come with age — and cause pain in the low back.

    HOW TO FIX IT
    If you suspect a serious condition is causing your low back pain go see a spine specialist.

Viewing 1 post (of 1 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Information contained in this website is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical condition. A diagnosis and a final determination of whether you may benefit from treatment at Beverly Hills Spine Surgery can only be made after you have been physically examined by our medical professionals.

Comments are closed.